South Wales Islamic centre Islamic centre Cardiff mosques in cardiff cardiff masjid Islamic centre wudu isalmic centre dead body wash room masjid in south wales islamic prayer hall cardiff masjid Islamic centre wudu
  • The reconstruction of the Islamic centre is of both material and spiritual significance, which will have the principal effect of opening up new opportunities for Wales. The project will contribute to raising awareness of the importance of education at the Mosque within the process of return and reconciliation, understanding that heritage is of shared value for all citizens. The project will contribute to the capacity building of students and young Professionals with regard to religion, history and culture. The development of the Islamic centre will bring economic benefits to the local labour market, creating employment for local building companies and labourers The development of the Islamic centre is of multiple significance, including: The Significance for the interests of the local community. The Islamic centre would be a symbol of identity, associated with the historical heritage of all those who live here. - The construction of the learning centre attached to the Mosque would represent not merely the recreation of its material values, but go far beyond this and above.
Extension Project

This business plan is for potential funders to gain an understanding of the area in which The Islamic Centre is situated, and the need for an extension of the Mosque to construct a learning centre.

We envisage the community as a whole will benefit from the new building and the facilities available to Muslims and non Muslims regarding their educational attainment into the research of Islam.

The global civilization created by Islam many years ago permitted people of diverse ethnic backgrounds to work together in cultivating various arts and sciences. Although the civilization was profoundly Islamic, even non-Muslim "people of the book" participated in the intellectual activity whose fruits belonged to everyone. Therefore we welcome scientists, men and women of learning to contribute and be active in the advancement of knowledge at our centre.

The new building will contribute to the following; 
1. The advancement of Islam. 
2. To cater for Muslims to carry out their religious and cultural beliefs.
3. To provide facilities where Muslims and Non Muslims can research Islam and its History.

This business plan goes some way to measure likely revenue streams to cover building, maintenance costs and possible capital spending. However, we are aware that the plan focuses on bringing the building up to a high standard of structural stability and presentation. More needs to be done on forward planning and we recommend that prospective donors and/or
Investors may wish to assist us in carrying out the project. An example of this could be in the form of providing a grant to match fund the costs of the building.
Also grants and donations to cover costs of furnishings, fittings and maintenance.

 

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1.1. Basic architectural features of the Mosque are to remain the same
A vital component for the Mosque is the architecture, both exterior and interior, of the building as it stands, and which it is the aim of this project to construct around and build a second floor. 
A description of the building and plans are included in appendix 1 which will show what a magnificent Mosque and learning centre it is to be.

The original Mosque will remain which has a single-space domed roof and a minaret abutting the left hand side.

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1.2. The site as an element of the mosque is considered in the light of the following features:
1. The construction of a learning centre 7x7meteres ground floor
2. The construction of pillars/stilts to hold the second level of the building which will need to be inserted 10 meters below ground level.
3. The construction of the second floor which will include 3 rooms, 2 wuthu room and a lift for the disabled;

The need for development of the mosque and learning centre is of great importance for the successful implementation of the advancement in the education of Islam, history and culture.

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1.2.1. The nature of the area in the context of its Demography, Cultural and Historical background
Following a period of decline during the 1970s and 1980s, Cardiff’s population is growing. The local authority area had an estimated population of more than 324,800 in 2008, compared to a 2001Census figure of 305,353 between mid-2007 and mid-2008, Cardiff was the fastest-growing local authority in Wales with population growth rate of 1.2% 
According to Census 2001 data, Cardiff was the 14th largest settlement in the United Kingdom and the 21st largest urban area. The Cardiff larger urban zone (a Euro stat definition including the Vale of Glamorgan and a number of local authorities in the valleys has 841,600 people, the 10th largest in the UK. The Cardiff and South Wales Valleys metropolitan area has a population of nearly 1.1 million people.
Official estimates derived from the census regarding the city's total population have been disputed. The city council has published two articles that argue the 2001 census seriously under reports the population of Cardiff and, in particular, the ethnic minority population of some inner city areas.
In the 2001 census Cardiff's Muslim population stood at 3.7%, above the auk average is 2.7% and significantly above the Welsh average. Cardiff has one of the longest-established Muslim populations in the UK, started by Yemeni sailors who settled in the city during the 19th century. Cardiff is now home to over 11,000 Muslims from many different nationalities and backgrounds.

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1.2.4. The need for development of The Islamic Centre and for the successful implementation of the project.

The success of the project is thus linked to the availability of funds and this is the only aspect which forms the basis for achieving the expected outcome. 
In the long term, the centre would be a hub for education based on high-quality facilities for service users. Furthermore, the centre would enhance the multiethnic culture, creating a favourable environmental and communal climate and developing partnerships. 

 

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1.3. Significance of reconstructing the Islamic centre 
The reconstruction of the Islamic centre is of both material and spiritual significance, which will have the principal effect of opening up new opportunities for Wales. The project will contribute to raising awareness of the importance of education at the Mosque within the process of return and reconciliation, understanding that heritage is of shared value for all citizens. The project will contribute to the capacity building of students and young
Professionals with regard to religion, history and culture.

The development of the Islamic centre will bring economic benefits to the local labour market, creating employment for local building companies
and labourers

The development of the Islamic centre is of multiple significance, including:
The Significance for the interests of the local community.
The Islamic centre would be a symbol of identity, associated with the historical heritage of all those who live here.
- The construction of the learning centre attached to the Mosque would represent not merely the recreation of its material values, but go far beyond this and above.

 

Extension Project

The projects for which major funding is sought.

The areas where we need to look at and where funding is required include: - Three quotes have been obtained from professional contractors this has come to an estimate of £1,000,000 it is also important that we seek Capitol and revenue on the basis that the project is a success. We have prepared this business plan to identify the running and maintenance costs of the building (including on-going repairs) and salaries and other personnel/ commissioning commitments. Also to finance projected capital costs. This Business Plan has been produced to inform potential funders and other stakeholders of the benefits of this important project. The South Wales Islamic Centre will make a valuable social contribution to the Muslim and Non Muslim community of Wales.

The need for development of The Islamic Centre and for the successful implementation of the projectt

The success of the project is thus linked to the availability of funds and this is the only aspect which forms the basis for achieving the expected outcome. In the long term, the centre would be a hub for education based on high-quality facilities for service users. Furthermore, the centre would enhance the multiethnic culture, creating a favourable environmental and communal climate and developing partnerships.

The nature of the area in the context of the current level of socio-economic development

Cardiff has a minority ethnic population of 37,100, mid-year estimate 2006, representing the highest proportion of non-white people in Wales. During 2006, a health care needs assessment was undertaken across Butetown and Grangetown. These two wards in the southern arc of Cardiff are well-recognised as containing some of the most socioeconomically deprived areas in Wales. However, they also contain some of the newest and most rapidly developing housing developments in the city.

The population in both wards has been growing rapidly and is predicted to continue to grow dramatically, with a greater proportion of younger people and children and smaller proportion of older people than Cardiff and Wales. There are a high proportion of residents from non-white ethnic groups in both wards; some of these groups are well established in Cardiff while others are new arrivals.
Deprivation is closely linked to poor health and increased mortality, and is significantly higher in these two wards. Deprivation may be at risk of becoming hidden in small pockets as areas of new housing cause an influx of people with different socio-economic status.

 

58% of Cardiff’s 30,000 students are concentrated in Central Cardiff particularly in Cathay’s (7,785), Plasnewydd (3,605) and Penylan (1,740). A large number are also resident in Gabalfa (3,110).